What is experience?

Our mind can accommodate the entire universe. That is why, there are skies upon skies available for our flight. Don’t be content easily. Those who remain content easily remain insignificant. Their joys, ecstasies and silences become insignificant.

Read more

That’s an aggressive way of doing business

Last winter, I was in a local store in Thimphu to buy some PS2 games for my son. I was surprised to notice that the shopkeeper did not even have the courtesy to greet us as we entered his shop. He remained as dumb as a statue as we struggled with our son to locate the games of his choice. We finally picked up a few DVDs and requested him to test them for us but he refused to do it saying they don’t do it. I asked him if we could return the games if they do not work, but he said we cannot return them once we have bought them. He handed over the DVDs to us with the note “No Return” written on them. Once we reached home, we realized that one of the DVDs was not working and that it could not be played. The “No Return” policy of the shop did not allow us to return it. The DVDs were not original either. It made me wonder if it was even ethical for them to burn and create such DVDs on their own for sale.

Read more

A piece of advice for young drug users

Last Friday, I was on my way to Thimphu from Phuntsholing when suddenly the bus I was travelling in was flagged down by police at Tsimasham for a surprised highway checking. The two policemen swooped in and headed straight towards the rear section of the bus where a group of young boys were seated. One by one, they started to frisk them until two sticks of cigarettes emerged from one of the boys’ shoes. The real drama began to unfold as one of the policemen pulled out small packages of cannabis drugs from around his seat. The boy was immediately removed from the bus for further scanning and interrogation. We all watched in disbelief as he was finally taken away for detention at Tsimasham Police Station. We had to wait for more than an hour while the police completed the formalities.

Read more

The future is here – Reconnecting with former classmates

Group photo with my class 12 mates at Jigme Sherubling High School in Khaling. Photo taken in the year 2000

With the evolution of social media, the world we live in has become very small today. Just at the click of a mouse or the swiping of a finger, we can easily connect with friends and families. It’s really amazing how social networking sites such as Facebook, Twitter and WeChat have transformed our way of interacting with people around us. More importantly, social media has helped us reconnect with even the lost generation of friends and relatives who have been separated by time and space. A couple of weeks ago, I was invited to a WeChat group forum called “Jigsher 2000” which was created by some of my former classmates to reunite us at least on social media. For the first time in 17 years, I could hear the voices of my former classmates with whom I had studied together in the year 2000. It was very exciting for all of us to talk to each other and relive the memories we had created together 17 years ago in Khaling. Many of us had not met even once after we completed class 12 but thanks to social media, I feel we are together again.

Read more

The pain of having to say goodbye

Photo of Harmony Youth Volunteers with DYS officials in the auditorium during the farewell dinner

Life is really a trail that runs zigzag across the wilderness of time. It often crosses into the lives of people who become special in our hearts. But no matter how much we try to hold on to the special moments we create and cherish together, we have to drop them off at one point of time as we continue our journey. This is a painful reality we often have to go through in our life. It’s true that time does not wait for us. It constantly keeps us on the move. As a result, it’s part of our life to meet and depart with people whom we love and appreciate. There is no time for us to stay forever with people who are special to us. People say that life is like a bicycle. We have to keep it moving in order to balance it. So there is no way we can stop it when we have met someone we love.

Read more

Signature vs. Thumb-impression: the only apparent yardstick used by banks to measure literacy

Recently, a group of six visually impaired people in Thimphu had gone to the Bank of Bhutan to apply for ATM and M-BoB services. But the bank did not accept their request because they could not sign. This has ignited an interesting discussion within the visually impaired community in Bhutan. I think the banks believe that all those who cannot sign are illiterate and hence, they can be irresponsible and vulnerable to theft and robbery. But not all the visually impaired people are illiterate. Everybody who has studied at Muenselling Institute in Khaling knows how to read and write, at least electronically or in braille. The only problem with them is that many of them do not have signatures just because they cannot sign. As a result, they are denied access to the online banking facilities which otherwise would make their lives much easier.

Read more

Revitalization of Bhutanese values

During my school days, the kind of respect we had for our teachers never changed even when they lashed us mercilessly. We did not have value-education classes but we knew our boundaries well. We have been culturally groomed to believe that teachers are like our parents and that we must respect them as much as we respect our parents. We have been convinced that we would earn respect if we know how to show respect to our elders and treat them with love and dignity. But sadly, this trend seems to be taking a different turn today. Probably due to the excessive exposure to western cultures through social and mainstream media outlets that have emerged with the technological revolution of the modern era, the youth of Bhutan appear to be gradually drifting away from the unique social and cultural values of our country that define us as Bhutanese. This rapid decline of values among the Bhutanese youth has triggered important discussions in the government agencies in the recent times. Upon the Royal Command of His Majesty the King, the Ministry of Education has already started working with the Royal Education Council (REC) to explore effective ways of inculcating our own national values into the young generation. The first draft of the curriculum framework for teaching values developed by REC was presented during the special meeting convened on 19th June 2017.

Read more

What should I do if I ever get a chance to see the world for a week?

The people with eyesight seem to see so little that they often fail to recognize what is around them. Whenever I hear about people falling off the cliff or bumping into objects on the way, I just wonder why they have not been able to make full use of their eyes. My wife occasionally goes out to attend public functions and celebrations, but always comes back to say that she did not see anything. I have many friends who have been in the woods but have not seen anything special there.

Read more

The key points to remember on the day of exam: a simple advice for students

Photo of Bhutanese students studying English subject. Image courtesy: Bhutan Culture Tour

Exams are particularly stressful events. During the final hours leading up to the day of exam, you panic a lot and often get confused with the lessons you have studied. The notes you have written with your own hand in the class appear like a totally new book and you spend hours scratching your head just trying to figure out what you have written. The textbooks do not make much sense and whatever lesson that has been taught does not flash back to memory. You feel completely lost. You keep studying through the late night but nothing seems to get into your head. You feel sleepy but you can’t fall asleep. It’s such a painful situation. The next morning you wake up with swollen eyes due to the lack of sleep and after trying to memorize a few things from the book, you drowsily head to the exam hall. In the hall, you are not in a position to think actively and creatively. You feel tired and when the question-paper lands before you, everything goes blank. You know that you are now doomed.

Read more

The five creepiest experiences of my life that still lack logical explanations

Whether you believe in ghosts or not, the fact is that it’s tough not to get freaked out when you experience something that cannot be explained. The shadowy figures and strange voices that go bump at night are still a great mystery to those who encounter them. But although ghosts cannot be proved to exist, the stories of ghosts and spirits have persisted throughout the human history. Even in Bhutan the history books talk so much about our great Buddhist masters like Guru Padma Sambhava and great Lamas sighting and subduing wrathful demons and evil spirits. So we are culturally brought up to believe that ghosts do not only exist in books and movies. Having personally been exposed to mysterious experiences a couple of times in my life, I am compelled to believe that there are at least some strange forces acting on us, if not ghosts. Consistent with the extensive research done by paranormal scientists around the world, it seems there are many people who believe in ghosts. For instance, the 2012 poll in the United States showed that 45 percent of Americans believed in paranormal phenomenon. This certainly shows that there are still many unsolved mysteries in the world. The following are some of the creepiest experiences I ever had in my life which baffle me even to this day. Honestly, I still don’t have any psychological or logical explanation for those mysterious encounters. Even if you don’t believe in ghosts, these stories might force you to wonder with me what else they could have been if they were not paranormal activities.

Read more

How school textbooks can transform your life

Before I went to school, I think I was a spoiled child. Perhaps because I was the only surviving child from my late mother, my father loved me too much during my childhood. As a result, he hardly cared what I did. He used to smoke biri at the time and often there used to be biri-butts in the pockets of his trousers. Out of curiosity, I tried to smoke one of them one day. But the moment I started inhaling the dark smoke, it drove me crazy. I began to puke uncontrollably. That was the first and the last time I ever tried to smoke. I could never appreciate it.

Read more

Wearing glasses cannot be the only determinant of visual disability: a small reflection from PHCB 2017

The Population and Housing Census of Bhutan (PHCB) is an important national exercise undertaken every after 10 years to determine the socio-economic status of the entire population. The last time we had this kind of survey was in 2005. The findings from this survey are expected to guide the future plans and policies of the government to boost socio-economic development of the country. Hence, it is not surprising to see the questionnaire covering different aspects of social, economic and public life of each individual when an enumerator walks into your house. The main intention behind having such a comprehensive set of questions is to get the exact socio-economic profile of a person. It is therefore very important for each of us to participate in the survey and get counted. After having patiently waited for one and half days, I finally got counted this evening.

Read more

The house that has outlived generations of occupants

Photo of myself in front of an ancient house in Wangdue Phodrang Dzongkhag. Picture taken on 21st May 2017

On the evening of 19th May 2017, I was invited to join a team of staff from the Disabled Persons’ Association of Bhutan (DPAB) to go to Wangdue Phodrang for a disability awareness program which was to be held over the weekends. The cool Friday evening breeze rejuvenated us as we eased our way through the mountains and valleys towards Wangdue Phodrang. It was about 8 o’clock in the evening when we reached the ancestral home of Sonam Deki, our team leader. We were to stay in this house until Sunday.

Read more

Highlights from the Tobacco Control (Amended) Act of Bhutan 2014

Recently, a taxi driver in Thimphu was taken aback when he was flagged down by police for having a Marlboro sticker pasted on the back of his car. He didn’t know that decorating his car with such stickers was an offence under the Tobacco Control (Amended) Act of Bhutan 2014. Likewise, there are many shopkeepers who still sell candy cigarettes to children not knowing that it is also an offence. The Tobacco Control (Amended) Act of Bhutan 2014 states that the sale or use of any product intended to promote the use of tobacco products is an offence. The candy cigarettes and the stickers of various brands of tobacco are believed to encourage people to smoke. This was one of the key messages conveyed during the Tobacco Awareness Program conducted in Kabisa in Thimphu by Khasadrapchu Youth Center on 12th May 2017 as part of its outreach sensitization program.

Read more

Cyber warning: beware of ransomware attacks

Decades ago, I remember people talking about the possible cyber war in the future. At that time, it did not make any sense to me. But today, it seems what people had feared for years is becoming a reality. The advanced computer technology of the modern age has given birth to many sophisticated hackers who are responsible for some of the deadliest cyber-attacks the world has ever seen in the recent history. The first was the widely publicized hacking of Sony Pictures in November 2014 in which a group named The Guardians of Peace hacked the database of the film studio and released several new films online. Then came the hacking of Hillary Clinton’s campaign during the 2016 US Election which led to the leak of thousands of confidential and private emails of the Democratic Party officials on WikiLeaks. Today, we are seeing another kind of cyber-attack, through a ransomware called WannaCry which has already affected more than 150 countries since last Friday. WannaCry is a malicious software that freezes your computer and demands $300 to be paid online if you want to regain access to your files. What causes more panic for the victims is that the ransomware threatens to permanently delete all the files within a week if the ransom money is not paid. Although there is no guarantee that the access will be granted after paying the money, the analysis of the Bitcoin Wallets has shown that a significant amount has already been paid by the victims in a desperate bid to get back their files and documents.

Read more