The pain of being deprived of the opportunity to grow up in a complete family

A couple of weeks ago, I was in Gelephu with my colleagues to coordinate the celebration of International Youth Day 2017. One of the activities leading up to the main event was the panel discussion on parents-children relationship which was conducted on the evening of 11th August, one day before the actual celebration. The main objective of holding the panel discussion was to bring the parents and children closer to each other and bridge the gap between them so that both the parties can understand each other better. The participants were put on the stage: parents on one side and youth on the other. Both the groups had a basket each from where they could pick up statements to be read aloud and start the discussion with other members. The discussion went on smoothly until one of the girls from the youth group picked up the statement “We don’t want our parents to quarrel in front of us”. While trying to explain what it meant to her, she emotionally broke down and cried. Later, we learned from her friends that her parents had divorced just recently and we all know how painful it would have been for her to go through such a terrible experience. The statement she had got could have definitely triggered her memories of all those horrific moments she had gone through as her parents fought their ways out. Only she could know what it is like to be a victim of domestic violence and how painful it is to be deprived of the opportunity to grow up in a complete family.

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What is experience?

Our mind can accommodate the entire universe. That is why, there are skies upon skies available for our flight. Don’t be content easily. Those who remain content easily remain insignificant. Their joys, ecstasies and silences become insignificant.

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That’s an aggressive way of doing business

Last winter, I was in a local store in Thimphu to buy some PS2 games for my son. I was surprised to notice that the shopkeeper did not even have the courtesy to greet us as we entered his shop. He remained as dumb as a statue as we struggled with our son to locate the games of his choice. We finally picked up a few DVDs and requested him to test them for us but he refused to do it saying they don’t do it. I asked him if we could return the games if they do not work, but he said we cannot return them once we have bought them. He handed over the DVDs to us with the note “No Return” written on them. Once we reached home, we realized that one of the DVDs was not working and that it could not be played. The “No Return” policy of the shop did not allow us to return it. The DVDs were not original either. It made me wonder if it was even ethical for them to burn and create such DVDs on their own for sale.

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A piece of advice for young drug users

Last Friday, I was on my way to Thimphu from Phuntsholing when suddenly the bus I was travelling in was flagged down by police at Tsimasham for a surprised highway checking. The two policemen swooped in and headed straight towards the rear section of the bus where a group of young boys were seated. One by one, they started to frisk them until two sticks of cigarettes emerged from one of the boys’ shoes. The real drama began to unfold as one of the policemen pulled out small packages of cannabis drugs from around his seat. The boy was immediately removed from the bus for further scanning and interrogation. We all watched in disbelief as he was finally taken away for detention at Tsimasham Police Station. We had to wait for more than an hour while the police completed the formalities.

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