The future is here – Reconnecting with former classmates

Group photo with my class 12 mates at Jigme Sherubling High School in Khaling. Photo taken in the year 2000

With the evolution of social media, the world we live in has become very small today. Just at the click of a mouse or the swiping of a finger, we can easily connect with friends and families. It’s really amazing how social networking sites such as Facebook, Twitter and WeChat have transformed our way of interacting with people around us. More importantly, social media has helped us reconnect with even the lost generation of friends and relatives who have been separated by time and space. A couple of weeks ago, I was invited to a WeChat group forum called “Jigsher 2000” which was created by some of my former classmates to reunite us at least on social media. For the first time in 17 years, I could hear the voices of my former classmates with whom I had studied together in the year 2000. It was very exciting for all of us to talk to each other and relive the memories we had created together 17 years ago in Khaling. Many of us had not met even once after we completed class 12 but thanks to social media, I feel we are together again.

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The pain of having to say goodbye

Photo of Harmony Youth Volunteers with DYS officials in the auditorium during the farewell dinner

Life is really a trail that runs zigzag across the wilderness of time. It often crosses into the lives of people who become special in our hearts. But no matter how much we try to hold on to the special moments we create and cherish together, we have to drop them off at one point of time as we continue our journey. This is a painful reality we often have to go through in our life. It’s true that time does not wait for us. It constantly keeps us on the move. As a result, it’s part of our life to meet and depart with people whom we love and appreciate. There is no time for us to stay forever with people who are special to us. People say that life is like a bicycle. We have to keep it moving in order to balance it. So there is no way we can stop it when we have met someone we love.

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Signature vs. Thumb-impression: the only apparent yardstick used by banks to measure literacy

Recently, a group of six visually impaired people in Thimphu had gone to the Bank of Bhutan to apply for ATM and M-BoB services. But the bank did not accept their request because they could not sign. This has ignited an interesting discussion within the visually impaired community in Bhutan. I think the banks believe that all those who cannot sign are illiterate and hence, they can be irresponsible and vulnerable to theft and robbery. But not all the visually impaired people are illiterate. Everybody who has studied at Muenselling Institute in Khaling knows how to read and write, at least electronically or in braille. The only problem with them is that many of them do not have signatures just because they cannot sign. As a result, they are denied access to the online banking facilities which otherwise would make their lives much easier.

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